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Apr 15

For the Regency by Wareeze Woodson

6376129It’s my pleasure to welcome Wareeze Woodson. Today, she Travels Back in Time to the popular Regency period.

Thank you for inviting me, Anna. Although I adore medieval romance with knights and knaves alike, I write Regency romance at present. Ah, the Regency, where balls, house parties, the theater and all sorts of merry amusements sought after in a frenzy of activity, are high on my lists of favorites. I choose to dwell on the frivolous gaiety of the period leaving the dark underbelly of wretched poverty for another day.

Almack’s, known to discerning gentlemen as the marriage mart, played a great role in the period. Obtaining a voucher became the height of desirability to a young lady wishing to make her debut in the Ton. If such a coveted prize failed to materialize, she could not be deemed a catch as it were, not fully accepted, if one cared for such nonsensical happenings.

No debutant could enter society with a merger wardrobe. Velvets, crepes and fine jaconet muslins to wear to the Assemblies at Almack’s were necessary. A few morning half-dresses, carriage dresses of cambric, Berlin silk, and velvet mantles were customary as well. Walking dresses, pelisses, capes, bonnets and certainly the ever present gloves, shoes, half-boots, reticules, silk stockings, all must grace her wardrobe. Ball gowns of silks and satins, festooned with knots of ribbons, flounces of lace, charming over-gowns were all worn to dazzle unsuspecting gentlemen into exclamations of admiration. I would love to peer into the window to view each young lady. Which would take and which would be left on the shelf.

I like a touch of suspense mixed with the romance. Always intrigued with the balls and parties, sometimes when the heroine ignores the rules, she leaves herself vulnerable to foul play. Frantic carriage rides, escape with danger on her heels, murder, even abductions both before and after the ball follow my heroines.

Music floating out onto a balcony where dense shadows hover over a young lady out to catch a breath of fresh air added a dash of romance to tale after tale of the Regency. Should she be alone on the balcony where the least breaching of the restrictions hedging her about could lead to total ruination—indeed not? Still, many an amusing young lady with a bit of dash about her made her way in society quite well, coming off with the hero of her dreams for a happy ever-after ending—always an important ending for this writer.

Biography:

I am a native of Texas and still live in this great state. I write period romance tangled with suspense. I married my high school sweetheart, years and years ago. We raised four children and have eight grandchildren, and grandchildren are Grand. At the moment, all my children and my grandchildren live within seventy miles of our home, lots of visits. My husband and I still love each other after all these years the stuff romance is made of, Happy Ever After!

Final-An-Enduring-Love-(med)Blurb for An Enduring Love: Born and raised in Latvia, Rebecca Balodis marries Rhys Sudduth, an English diplomat. Shortly thereafter, he is summoned home to attend his father’s death-bed. Rebecca cannot accompany him at the time and becomes trapped in the turmoil plaguing her country. He is informed she died in the upheaval.

Nearly four years later, she escapes and arrives in London with their son in tow. Arriving in the middle of his sister’s ball is very awkward, especially since Rhys plans to announce his betrothal to a young debutante later in the evening.

Trouble, tangled in suspense and danger, follow her from Latvia. Can this pair ever find or even recognize an enduring love? Is it worth keeping?

http://buff.ly/1qqyBSe Amazon link for An Enduring Love

An Added Bonus Feature!

A letter discovered in the belongings of the villain. This letter is not revealed in the book, however it is held in my heart and gives insight to the story. A tidbit solely for you. Enjoy.

The Year of Our Lord 1813
My Dearest Husband,

I write with my heart filled with sorrow. My beloved mother has passed on to join my father in Heaven. I can only be happy for her although sadness weighs me down. I am now acquainted with deep sadness and how you must mourn for your father. Grief makes it hard to write, but you deserve to know why I am delayed in departing this land.

At the moment, I am trapped in Latvia due to the up-rising in my country. I do not know how long it may be before I am allowed to travel to England to join you. There is a guard placed outside my gate to prevent my departure at present, but I will travel to Rica at the first opportunity and board a ship to London. Perhaps all will settle quickly. I can only pray it shall be so.

I cannot wait to be in your arms again, to kiss your dear face and gaze into your eyes once more. With words, you painted a lovely picture of your home in England and of your relatives. The thought of meeting your family holds much pleasure for me, especially since I am now alone.

Take care, My Love. I shall write to let you know as the hour of my departure grows closer. Keep safe and know you have my enduring love.

Yours Always,

Rebecca Sudduth

Thanks, Wareeze. I’m intrigued by the unusual background to this story. Definitely on my TBR pile. Anna.

5 comments

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  1. Rose Gorham

    Enjoyed the blurb. The letter only whets my appetite to read Rebecca’s story.

  2. Meg Bellamy

    I love that this story involves a heroine from Latvia. Sounds great!

  3. Sylvie Grayson

    Hi Wareeze,
    It all sounds very exciting, and with the added bonus of a bit of suspense it just makes it that much more intriguing. Very nice to read your story and get to know your books,
    Sylvie

  4. Shereen Vedam

    Loved the mysterious letter, Wareeze, and the story sounds wonderful!

    1. Wareeze

      Thanks to each of you for the kind words. I love writing the story and hope you have the opportunity to read it..

      Wareeze Woodson

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